Countless Islands, Pristine Beaches, Bountiful Wrecks and Contiguous Reefs  Forget the rest! Dive the BEST!!! diveUNDA with Ultimate Nature Diving Adventures. We picked the best sites, put them together, and provided you with a comfortable, safe and inexpensive live-aboard so you can have one of the most unforgettable adventures of a lifetime. Multiple direct daily flights from Manila with major airlines allow you to be in Coron within an hour.  Palawan, Philippines is quickly gaining popularity as one of the most beautiful places in the world with some of the best wreck and reef diving to be found. The readers of Travel and Leisure magazine voted the exotic archipelago number one two times in a row.  Coron has been described as one of the best spots in the World for Wreck diving. On the 24th of September 1944, 24 Japanese Ships were sunk by an American air raid. 12 wrecks have been discovered up to now.  With such a variety of diving options, how can you know which is the best?  Well, if you go to Coron, there are plenty of dive shops. They all do daily diving on the same wrecks in Coron Bay, which often has poor visibility due to a tidal affected silty bottom and overcrowding, with not only divers but snorkeling tourists arriving regularly at the dive sites. The local operators arenít able to get out of the Bay and into the open ocean where the best diving is. To do that youíll need to either stay at one of the expensive resorts on an island and be limited to their local dive spots or be on a live-aboard. Thatís not to say the wrecks in Coron Bay arenít worth a dive, even if just for their historical significance. If you do decide to check them out, make sure you plan your dives 3 to 4 days before either quarter moon when the tides are at their weakest, allowing for the best visibility of about 9 meters.  Did I mention Apo Reef? Mention Apo Reef to seasoned Philippines travellers and chances are they will tell you about a distant diving paradise accessible only on expensive live-aboard trips or having to travel to difficult and remote areas to find someone to take you.  Not only diving, there is also an active population of dugongs in the northern part of the island, with regular recent sightings of a dugong family; mother, father and baby calf all swimming together. Itís thought that sailors saw dugongs and mistook them as mermaids. Maybe they had a little too much Rum that day.  Apo Reef Marine National Park Largest Reef in Asia and the second largest Reef in the World Apo Reef, the second largest contiguous coral reef in the world after Australiaís Great Barrier Reef, lies in the middle of the South China Sea, seven to eight hours from Coron on Busuanga Island or four to five hours from the northern part of Busuanga Island.  The consensus in most dive circles is that Apo is the top dive site in the country, the only real competition coming from the even more remote Tubbataha Reef in the Sulu Sea, many hundreds of kilometres away, which is only accessible for a few months each year.  Youíll be in awe of the clarity of the water, the magnificent overhangs and drop-offs the reef offers as well as the vertical walls going 80 meters/260 feet deep.  In recent years many divers have been experiencing curious hammerhead sharks along Apo Reef. Devil ray, great manta and eagle ray are also very common on these locations and are often spotted in large schools. Due to its location very far out in the South China Sea, the visibility on Apo Reef is often more than excellent and itís never crowded, except of course for the marine life. The quantity of fish at Apo is mind boggling, with dogfish tuna and huge schools of jacks patrolling the depths just off the reef alongside a parade of barracudas and white-tip, black-tip and reef sharks. In the shallows, you might scare up sleeping nurse sharks and eagle rays, trail giant Napoleon wrasses and Hawksbill sea turtles, spot moray eels peeking out of the rocks and part dense thickets of blue mackerel scad. You may even see schools of dolphins leaping and shimmering around the Bangka on your way to and from the reef.  Such an impressive and diverse array of pelagic life is unheard of at other dive sites in the Philippines, which are better known for corals and colourful macro (small marine) life. But the macro life at Apo Reef is also splendid - a dizzying kaleidoscope of hard and soft corals, luminescent anemones and nudibranchs, pygmy seahorses, pipefish and other wondrous small creatures.  The Ultimate Wrecks of Coron - Kyokuzan, Okikawa, Akitsushima and the mysterious Black Island Wreck Kyokuzan Maru Wreck - The Best Regarded by some as the best of all the Coron area shipwrecks. Kyokuzan Maru, a 135m long supply ship sunk upright on a slope in clear water and next to a reef, very close to the beach on Dimalanta Island. Cargo holds still have the remains of trucks and cars to be seen. The wreck is nearly almost intact and quite easy to penetrate with several large cargo holds to descend in to.    This wreck was sunk on the north side of Busuanga Island and because of its distance to the other wrecks you will more than often find no one else there. Visibility is better here than in Coron Bay and often reaches up to 20 meters. The deepest parts of the wreck is at 40 meters, while most of the deck levels are between 22 and 28 meters.    The wreck attracts a lot of marine life, so it offers something for everyone. At least two dives on this wreck are recommend and can be combine with a shallower dive on the nearby reef.  Okikawa Maru Wreck - The Biggest The Okikawa Maru, at 160 meters, is the largest wreck of the Coron Bay. This is a brilliant dive for wreck and reef enthusiasts. The very top of the superstructure starts at a shallow 10 meters and the bottom of the ship rests at 26 meters.  The whole wreck is a coral reef environment on its own, with hard and soft corals covering the entire length and width. Huge amounts of tropical reef fish surround the wreck and feed in the often strong current but even during times when the currents are running, you will always be able to find sheltered areas on this massive tanker.  The macro life is excellent as well. Watch out for rare nudibranches and flatworms. Great penetrations dives can be made entering at the propeller shaft through to the huge engine room and on into the oil tank. The bow sits almost vertical and you can only imagine the forces involved bending this structure that way. The Okikawa Maru is also an excellent site for wreck dive training courses.  Akitsushima Maru Wreck - The Warship The Akitsushima is a former Seaplane Tender laying on her port side. This warship is 118m long and is now one of the best dive site around Coron. It is located not far from another great spot, the Okikawa Maru Wreck.  The Akitsushima was sunk on September 24 ,1944 during World War 2 by an American Air attack. It now lies in good shape on her port side 36m deep. The shallowest point of the wreck is 22m deep.  Black Island Wreck - The Mysterious The location of the wreck, Nanshin Maru, is very close to the fabulous beach of Black Island, one of the most mysterious and beautiful islands in the area; it looks like a perfect pirate island.  Thereís a great opportunity for a land based excursion to relax on the pristine sand with the crystal clear water lapping at your feet or venture off to explore the caves, swimming in pools of brackish water. Because of the isolated location, the area will usually be deserted.  The Black Island Wreck is an excellent dive site for wreck diving novices because of the shallow depth. The wreckís depth starts at 21 meters and the deepest point at 32 meters with 20 meters or more visibility. It is also perfect for undersea photographers and night dives.  The wreck has plenty of fish who make their home in it. You can find large scorpionfish as well as lionfish on this site. Youíll be fascinated by the schools of batfish, trumpetfish, and sweepers that share their habitat. Emperor angelfish and six-banded angelfish also live around the Black Island Wreck. Sponges, hydroids, and crinoids are also found here.  Youíll have a beautiful diving experience in the clear waters of Black Island.  Snorkeling with mermaids They're not mermaids, they're DUGONGS The dugong is a medium-sized marine mammal. It is one of four living species of the order Sirenia, which also includes three species of manatees. Dugongs and other sirenians are not closely related to other marine mammals, being more related to elephants. They are the only strictly marine herbivorous mammal and can be extremely long-lived, reaching ages of 70 years or more.   The word "dugong" derives from the Tagalog term dugong which was in turn adopted from the Malay duyung, both meaning "lady of the sea". Other common local names include "sea cow", "sea pig" and "sea camel".  It is thought the legends of mermaids may have originated when sailors, from a distance, glimpsed dugongs swimming in the water and mistook them for half-human half-fish creatures. 100% pure adventureÖ UNDA dive

Ultimate Nature Diving Adventures

Ultimate Nature Diving Adventures

Ultimate Nature Diving Adventures